Greatest Hits: Volume 3 (Home Stretch)

Greatest Hits

And just like that, we are two weeks into 2021.

I think we can all agree that so far, it hasn’t really felt any different from 2020.

New mutations popping up across the world – and spreading faster than anyone could expect. Cases (and casualties) continuing to rise despite ever-stricter lockdown measures.

The healthcare system, and all the brave people who are working 24/7 to keep it going, remain under immense pressure.

But make no mistake – this time is different.  The light at the end of the tunnel is getting ever brighter.

Here in the UK, we have now vaccinated about 5% of the population and are now vaccinating roughly two million people a week.

Not too shabby, given our government hasn’t exactly led the way in handling the pandemic.

Other countries are even further ahead – witness Israel crossing the 20% vaccination mark a few weeks ago. Many others are bound to catch up.

The finishing line is now well in sight. And as with any race, it’s not how you start – it’s how you finish.

We are literally mere weeks away from being able to (slowly) get back to normal. Those of us who are fortunate enough to be healthy and employed have tons to be grateful for.

So hang tight – and do whatever you can to help those who need it. Even if that means simply staying at home and keeping your spirits high.

With that in mind, here are some excellent reads to get your weekend off on the right note.

From yours truly:

Five Reasons To Look For A New Job This Year

Investments, Investment Vehicles, And Investment Platforms

If you are skeptical things will EVER get back to normal, you are certainly not alone.

The world seems to have bifurcated between the haves – and the have-nots.

Morgan Housel (who published one of the best personal finance books of 2020) explores the two conflicting narratives in Two Worlds: So Much Prosperity, So Much Skepticism.

Are you optimistic about the future, but think the market is getting ahead of its skis?

Waiting to buy the dip?

The Irrelevant Investor explores why that might not be a great idea in Here’s What Happens When You Buy The Dip.

Feel like you missed out on all the stock market gains last year?  It could be worse.

A programmer on the West Coast has just two tries remaining to access $240m of Bitcoin in his wallet.

In the meantime, Nick Maggiulli changes his mind on Bitcoin. And fellow UK blogger Finumus can rightfully say he called it first.

For anyone who is itching to jump on the active investing bandwagon and join the army of Robin Hood traders, The Evidence-Based Investor explains why most Robinhood traders lose money.

Also – it’s totally okay to build wealth slowly.  As a matter of fact, there are plenty of advantages to that approach.

In other words, love thyself – and your investing style.

Since the ugly events at the Capitol ten days about, a lot has been said about the existential crisis facing the world’s pre-eminent democracy.

But are things really that bad?

As it turns out, we’ve been down this path before.  Bunker Riley takes us on a journey in The Soul Of America.

Notwithstanding all the doom and gloom, plenty of bankers (myself included) will have reasons to be excited over the next few weeks.

That’s right, the bonus season is upon us.

I’ve always found it fascinating that most bankers, despite leading outwardly affluent lives, don’t really have much to show for their years of toiling away.

Then again, it applies to other well-paid professions as well.

In a great example, the Physician on FIRE talks about how much doctors make – and why it really doesn’t matter.

If you are a high earner but have lots of debt and limited time, you want to pay attention here.

And to wrap it up for the day, here’s a fantastic collection of ten investing insights in ten simple charts from Four Pillar Freedom.

Just can’t get enough?  Then pick up one of the excellent books below:

The Man Who Solved The Market

Bad Blood: Secrets And Lies In A Silicon Valley Start-up

Not Fade Away: A Short Life Well Lived (you can read my review here)

Happy reading!

About Banker On FIRE

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Banker On FIRE is a London-based M&A (mergers and acquisitions) investment banker.  I am passionate about capital markets, behavioural economics, financial independence and living the best life possible.

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4 Comments

    • I agree it’s going to be wobbly but I’ve got a strong conviction that by the time early March rolls around, we will see most restrictions lifted.

      If we have some inconveniences on the margin, I think that’s manageable – as long as we don’t live under complete lockdown for the next 12 months.

  1. We may see restrictions starting to lift but the clinical implications of the virus is only just starting. As a physician, forgive me for being less optimistic when we have over 42000 people awaiting life saving procedures, and not including the hundreds of thousands of missed diagnoses due to lost diagnostics and screening. Hospitals across the country are currently facing the worst crises they have ever seen in terms of volumes. Though the country may return to a sense of normality economically in the short term, we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg of its long term effects.

    • Hadn’t realized you are a physician – hope you are holding up as well as you can, considering the circumstances! And a big thanks for what must have been an exhausting 12 months.

      I can only hope, though I am far from convinced, that the pandemic will act as an (unwelcome) trigger to make the necessary investments in our healthcare system.

      That being said, I agree that there will be a long stretch of “catching up” with everything that was put on the backburner. Sadly, as you say, it will be too late for some.

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